THE SELFIE MANIA

A couple of days back I read of a shocking incident that had happened in the October of 2014, in Italy. A female nurse was arrested for the murder of 38 victims. But what was more shocking was a disturbing photo seized by the police: a selfie the nurse took of herself (in her hospital scrubs) standing near the body of a recently deceased patient while smiling and making a thumbs-up gesture! The local prosecutor, aghast at the horrific nature of the evidence remarked, “In all my professional years of seeing shocking photos, there were few such as these.”

Sometime back, the Indian newspapers carried the story of a young lad who lost his life while taking a selfie on a railway track with a fast approaching train behind him! So sad. He didn’t live to share his daring act!

To make the mood of this article a bit lighter, how many of you have competed with family members and friends as to who can pout the best for a selfie?

Yes, the selfie trend has brought in with it pouty poses (horns, winks and V-signs were already there before). Be it alone or with a group of friends, to pout for a selfie is the in-thing. Sounds cool!

While clicking selfies for harmless fun captures good moments, an overdose of ‘taking selfies’ is really something to worry about.

The American Psychiatric Association (APA) has officially declared taking ‘selfies’ a mental disorder. The disorder is named ‘selfitis’ and is defined as the obsessive compulsive desire to take photos of one’s self and post them on social media as a way to make up for the lack of self-esteem and to fill a gap in intimacy.

According to APA, there are three levels of the disorder:

  • Borderline selfitis – taking photos of one’s self at least three times a day but not posting them on social media
  • Acute selfitis – taking photos of one’s self at least three times a day and posting each of the photos on social media
  • Chronic selfitis – Uncontrollable urge to take photos of one’s self round the clock and posting the photos on social media more than six times a day

Well well, if you are not in any of these three categories, you are sort of safe. But yes, the separating line is not impermeable!

When I started taking selfies, I really had to learn the right way to incline the camera at the right angle, place the finger at the right postion for the click, take a proper pose with the background in mind, smile and then c..c..click… After the initial clumsiness, when I sort of got used to it (haven’t mastered it yet), I had the urge to take a couple of selfies after I reached my workplace early in the morning and then later when I was about to wind up for the day – just to compare how fresh I looked as I started the day and how worn out I looked as the workday came to an end. I generally never took selfies at other times. Neither did I post them in any social media site. On a few occasions, I shared a couple of good ones with friends and family.

But each day as I took those selfies at my workplace and looked at myself, I wondered why I was doing it. Wasn’t it making me focus more on ‘how I look’ rather than on ‘who I am’? Yes, indeed appearance is an integral part of who we are. However, I felt that clicking selfies is making me focus more on ‘the me’ and ‘the I’ and there was a danger of slipping into an obsession regarding one’s looks. So, no more selfies in the workplace for me!

An occasional selfie with a group of loved ones or at a scenic place of visit is definitely something to cherish. But when we become fixated with our own image, it does speak something more than just a picture.

Our feel-good factor should not rest merely with how we look externally – in our own eyes or in the eyes of others. It is definitely much more than that.

The story is told in Greek mythology about a hunter called Narcissus who was known for his beauty. Once he saw his own reflection in a pool and fell in love with it, not realizing that it was merely an image. Unable to leave the beauty of his reflection, Narcissus lost his will to live. He stared at his reflection until he died. Thus we have the origin of the term narcissism, a fixation with oneself and one’s physical appearance or public perception. And, several decades back, the APA classified one of the personality disorders as Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

Some of you may feel that I am simply making a harmless selfie sound so terrifying. But, its important to remember that our gestures towards ourselves do convey a world load of meaning about our psychological state.

As I have stated before, an occasional selfie for a memory does not indicate psychological ill-health. Its only when we become obsessive about taking selfies every now and then, that it is something to worry about.

The need for appreciation, approval, acceptance, affirmation, self-esteem; a feeling of loneliness and depression steer one to find satisfaction in one’s own self. And these are the chief factors that unconsciously propel us to love or hate our own images.

The next time you incline your camera to click a selfie, do pause for a moment and ask yourself why are you about to take this selfie.

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10 thoughts on “THE SELFIE MANIA

  1. Excellent article Rajnandini… What APA has stated is really alarming… I absolutely agree with the fact that self obsession is dangerous and a disorder.

    But I want to fight for a woman. Because a woman is created beautifully by God and by nature she is more conscious about how she looks… So for her I don’t think it’s a disorder to a certain extent. But crossing over that extent might lead a woman towards self-obsession. What you had explained must be considered: “But when we become fixated with our own image, it does speak something more than just a picture.”

    And the line which really made me think was: “Our feel-good factor should not rest merely with how we look externally – in our own eyes or in the eyes of others. It is definitely much more than that.” Fantastic.

    What an eye opener!!! God bless you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for the words of appreciation 🙂 Yes, APA declaration is alarming indeed, but is backed up with intensive research and survey.

      Firstly, be it a man or a woman, it applies to both.
      Secondly, since man and woman are both created in God’s very own image, both genders are beautiful according to the creative genius of God. No doubt about that! No harm in looking good or appreciating beauty (of one’s own self or that of others). But yes, taking it to a level of obsession is certainly harmful psychologically as well as spiritually, because it shifts one’s focus towards one’s own self and hence, gradually away from God with each passing day.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, that’s a very valid point indeed. I remember that Proverb which reads as: “Charm is deceptive, and beauty is fleeting; but a woman who fears the LORD is to be praised.”

        But the Creator has created us with wisdom and has given us enough wisdom to understand where to draw the line. And when we are fool and fail to understand that then we are in danger of entering into the territory of varied disorders.that affect us mentally, emotionally, spiritually and even physiologically.

        Like

  2. I cannot stand this self obsessed selfie craze. People who post photo after photo of themselves on FB make me wonder if they are trying to prove they are worthwhile. Do something that proves your worth. Don’t take a photo of yourself.

    Liked by 1 person

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